The ESI Digital Summit is the exclusive online version of Esports Insider’s industry-leading esports business conferences. Alongside brand showcases, discussions on pressing topics, and ample networking opportunities are debates.

On the first day of the event, May 26th, there will be a dedicated track just for debates. Prominent figures and behind-the-scenes pioneers will delve into numerous topics that make up the past and present of esports as part of our ‘Think’ series.

Listen in as leading luminaries from esports provide their analysis and perspectives, allowing you to be better attuned to the ever-changing circumstances of the industry. Let’s take a look at some of the topics on the agenda.

Great debates at the ESI Digital Summit

Is the esports calendar getting too crowded?

More titles, more tournaments, more players – more enjoyment? With new games entering the market and quickly meeting the demands of a competitive community – think Fortnite, Apex Legends, or VALORANT – naturally comes an increasingly-crowded esports calendar.

The competitive faction of gaming is vastly growing year-on-year, and it had already been effectively impossible to stay on top of the entire industry. Should spectators pick their favourite games and simply follow those instead of being a fan of ‘esports’ as a whole? Should there be less action so we can all stay on top of the daily occurrences?

VALORANT Gameplay
Image credit: Riot Games

How integral is the development of media rights in esports to the industry at large?

In the past 12 months, media rights deals have become a bigger piece of the pie when it comes to revenue for tournament organisations. Despite esports being a predominantly-digital industry, we’ve observed an increase in linear TV broadcast deals.

With ESL and DreamHack coming together to forge the ESL Pro Tour, for example, the MTG-owned tournament organisers have been able to sell such rights more than ever before – and for a higher cost, too. With monetisation on the tip of every industry person’s tongue, how integral is the development of media rights to esports?

What’s next for esports-related venues of all shapes and sizes post-quarantine?

The likes of Allied Esports and Nerd Street Gamers are working hard to develop physical locations dedicated to esports in the West, but COVID-19 has shown the vulnerability of such an endeavour.

Their ambitious plans are in action, despite the ongoing obstacles in place, but what’s next for them once limitations are lifted? How will things change moving forward? Has this unfortunate situation opened their eyes to supplementary and complementary business ventures? This session will tackle all of these topics and more.

Nerd Street Gamers Localhost Los Angeles
Photo credit: Nerd Street Gamers

The bubble won’t burst, but the dam is leaking – should we expect consolidation in esports in 2020?

There are a lot of companies in esports, with new ventures being launched each and every week. The industry has no major barrier to entry so it’s easy to get started, and it’s an attractive prospect for many when you listen to the narratives of esports being the ‘next big thing.’ From a competitive organisation to a media endeavour, companies of all shapes and sizes are popping up.

Some people believe that consolidation is the key to battling the lack of cashflow we see in certain sectors of the industry, with companies joining forces to strengthen their market share and cut some costs. This debate will posit the potential benefits and pitfalls of such moves.


If this small selection of debates piques your interest, the ESI Digital Summit can provide much more value for you. Secure your spot while you can!



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